Blue Cheesecake?

This was a great cheesecake.  We took Rogue Creamery Caveman Blue and turned it into a cheesecake.  It was on a Walnut-Graham Cracker Crust with Candied Walnuts and Warm Caramelized Apples.  It turned out so much more that what I was expecting.

Compressed Rogue Creamery Blue Cheese

We make buttermilk crackers and serve it with pickled red onions and grapes.  Can’t wait to start smoking my own sausage to add to this plate…

Sous Vide Rogue Creamery Blue Cheese?

Sure, why not?  The cheese is not subject to heating,  just a vacuum and pressing that alters the texture to a more creamy consistency and a marble-like appearance.

Striploin with Chanterelles and Sous Vide Rogue Creamery Blue Cheese

We trim and cut striploin into paves and sear them.  We plate with Fall sweet peas, baby carrots from our garden, chanterelles from the coast and a “fondue” also made from Rogue Creamery Caveman Blue. 

We take about 8 ounces of the cheese and vacuum seal it.  We then roll it out with a rolling pin and the effect is like marble.  I trim thin strips and use it as a base to the presentation.

Sous Vide Filet Crusted With Rogue Creamery Blue

WIth Crispy Potatoes and Peas and Carrots (5-Color Baby Carrots from our garden…)

More Springtime.

River’s Edge Fresh Chevre Gelato with Spring Strawberry-Pistachio Ice Cream and Strawberry Gelee.  Now all we need is some micro lemon mint.  Where are those grow lights, anyway?

It’s all about the display…

Here are some shots of the cheese table that Platon set up from the old growth local pear tree wood he cut down.  He did a remarkable job and it truly shows the effort put into it.  Local cheeses displayed on local pear wood.  Awesome!

WOW!

Techniques.

How do you get 132 filets cooked to Medium Rare at one time all at once?

Why, Sous Vide of course…

And how do you melt some of the best blue cheese in the Nation into the filets?

With a *LITTLE* propane.

 

Oregon Cheesemaker’s Guild Dinner Final

This was a great time.  Really enjoyed havin fun with some killer cheese.  Thanks for all that came.  We had a sell out crowd of 132 people. 

Ancient Heritage Dairy Scio Heritage Sheep’s Milk Cheese and Prosciutto Sandwich with Creamy Sweet Onion and Duck Confit Soup with White Truffle Essence

Green Olive Stuffed Quail over Tillamook White Cheddar Polenta with Crispy Cheddar Tuilles

Rogue Creamery Caveman Blue Cheese Crusted Filet of Beef with Oregon Black Truffle-Potato Puree, Spring Onion and Sweet Pea Ragout and Local Cabernet Reduction

Three Ring Farms River’s Edge Fresh Chevre and Pistachio Truffles with Belgium Hot Chocolate Topped with Cocoa “Caviar”

Oregon Cheesemakers Guild Dinner SOLD OUT.

Sorry, folks.  I just got the cheeses today.  Man, are they fantastic!  Thanks to Rogue Creamery, Ancient Heritage Dairy, Three Ring Farms, and the Tillamook folks for all this killer cheese…  Here is the heart and the sole of the dinner.

Oregon Cheese Guild Dinner Coming!

Mark your calendars.  March 19th at 6:15pm at the US Hotel right next to the Jacksonville Inn.  We will be featuring cheeses from Rogue Creamery, Three Ring Farms, Tillamook and Ancient Heritage Dairy.  Tickets are $75 a person all inclusive.

http://www.roguecreamery.com/product.asp?specific=231

Menu

1st Course:

Ancient Heritage Dairy Scio Heritage Sheep’s Milk Cheese and Prosciutto Sandwich with Creamy Sweet Onion and Duck Confit Soup with White Truffle Essence

2nd Course

Green Olive Stuffed Quail over Tillamook White Cheddar Polenta with Crispy Cheddar Tuilles

3rd Course

Rogue Creamery Caveman Blue Cheese Crusted Filet of Beef with Oregon Black Truffle-Potato Puree, Spring Onion and Sweet Pea Ragout and Local Cabernet Reduction

4th Course

Three Ring Farms River’s Edge Chevre and Pistachio Truffles with Belgium Hot Chocolate

 

There is also a day-long festival on Saturday the 20th at Rogue Creamery in Central Point.  General admission is only $10 and $5 for a wine flight.  It will take place in a farmer’s market style under a huge tent and promises to be a lot of fun. 

“The farmer’s market format will present an interactive experience between makers and visitors, giving everyone an opportunity to talk about the product, the process and learn each individual cheesemaker’s story,” says David Gremmels, owner with Cary Bryant of Rogue Creamery. “It’s a way to truly be connected with the source of the cheese being presented.”

I hope to see you there!

 

Abacela Wine Maker’s Dinner Coming!

Tickets can be purchased from me.  5 Courses with wines from Abacela Winery here in Roseburg Oregon.  $75 all inclusive.  Seats are limited.  Hosted by the Jacksonville Inn.  February 26th 6:30pm.

Menu:

Saffron Risotto Cakes with Clams, Mussels, Portuguese Sausage and Baby Winter Broccoli

  • 2008 Albarino

Roasted Beet and Herbed Goat Cheese “Ravioli” with Pesto Vinaigrette

  • 2008 Granache Rose

Seared Lamb Carpaccio with Black Oregon Truffle Aioli, Baby Frisee and Focaccia Chips

  • 2001 Syrah

Olive Oil Poached (Sous Vide) Filet of Beef topped with Cod Cakes, Basil and Brown Butter Green Beans with toasted Pine Nuts

  • 1999 Tempranillo Estate

Rogue Creamery Blue Cheese Three Ways:

  1. Sous Vide with Oven Cured Raspberries
  2. Creme Brulee
  3. Port Wine Poached Seckle Pears filled with Candied Walnuts and Brutal Blue
  • 2006 Port

Note that some items may change slightly due to seasonality or availability.  Trust though, it will be good.

Check out the Winery:

www.abacela.com

World Class Cheese, Wines and Food. What’s Next for Southern Oregon? How about Olive Oil?

Farmer looks to kick start olive oil industry in S. Oregon

By Ron Brown
 
July 13, 2009
 
MEDFORD, Ore. – With Southern Oregon establishing it’s reputation for growing grapes, another warm climate crop is starting to take root.
 
More than 130 acres between Jacksonville and Medford are the beginning of what some hope will be an olive oil industry in the Rogue Valley.
 
Olive tree Grower Jeff Hoyal has planted more than 86,000 Greek and Spanish olive varieties he believes are well-suited to this area’s weather and soil.
 
“We have Koriniki, which is a Greek variety, a very peppery oil. We have Arbisona, which is a Spanish variety and is a very sweet oil. And then we have Arbiqina, which is another Spanish variety, which is a very buttery oil. And all three of them are, historically, create the top quality extra virgin oil that, that you’re really looking for,” Olive Tree Grower Jeff Hoyal said.
 
The Oregon State University extension service in Southern Oregon is also experimenting with 60 trees in a test plot.

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